Preventing Institutional Knowledge from Walking Out the Door

 Lisabeth Wachutka, a Pueblo Chemical Depot specialist in ammunition surveillance, explains the storage and handling of stacks of mustard gas-equipped artillery shells held in an ammunition storage igloo recently at the depot in Pueblo. Workers at the depot are preparing to destroy the mustard-agent weapons made for use in World War I. Photo by MIKE CHRISTY/The Gazette

Lisabeth Wachutka, a Pueblo Chemical Depot specialist in ammunition surveillance, explains the storage and handling of stacks of mustard gas-equipped artillery shells held in an ammunition storage igloo recently at the depot in Pueblo. Workers at the depot are preparing to destroy the mustard-agent weapons made for use in World War I. Photo by MIKE CHRISTY/The Gazette

U.S. ARMY CHEMICAL MATERIAL ACTIVITY (CMA)
MARKET LEAD, PROJECT MANAGER
Nov 2013-May 2016 

CHALLENGE: CMA is a U.S. Army organization that supports the Nation’s sun-setting mission of chemical demilitarization (ChemDemil). As CMA prepares to decommission, there are risks to the capture of the organization’s highly specialized tacit and explicit ChemDemil knowledge.

SOLUTION: I led a consulting engagement with CMA to implement a Knowledge Management program that supports: 1) Knowledge Continuity amidst increases in retirement, organizational changes and attrition; 2) Lessons Learned Capture to support innovation and learning throughout enduring ChemDemil operations; 3) Technology and Content Management solutions for the organization’s Big Data and analytics needs; and 4) Employee Engagement and Governance to promote ownership in knowledge management best practices.

RESULT: CMA has knowledge sharing processes and SharePoint-based content management tools to support the capture and sharing of institutional knowledge and lessons learned, making overall mission operations safer, more effective, and more efficient. CMA is in compliance with Army records retention schedules and regulations.

Nicole Clark